It’s Your Time for Self-Care

We live in a world designed to distract us. Our clicks and views are worth money and so our technology has been well adapted to ensnare and maintain engagement. But we are adaptable creatures and thus we become acclimated to that information bombardment. We become habituated to distraction and information overload. In so doing we have become stressed out and uncomfortable with silence and stillness, all of which takes its toll on our health.

It is no surprise that the need for self-care is on the rise and that so many have taken to ideas like Forest Bathing and Forest Therapy to find solace and healing in the woods. I can’t say I have ever met someone who did not instinctively feel that getting outdoors is good for you. Simply tuning out from the assault on our senses modern life has become is enough to begin rediscovering ourselves. The beneficial effect of spending time in nature has not gone unnoticed. Japan was the forerunner in this research and it has since swept the globe. The science backing practices like Forest Bathing and Forest Therapy is staggering. Such practices are no longer relegated to the touchy-feely or New Age sort it is sometimes attributed to. Everyone from stay-at-home parents to CEOs have begun to embrace this simple yet rewarding practice.

Hudson Valley Forest Therapy is here to meet that need for self-care in the New York City area up through the mid-Hudson Valley region by offering affordable services including Forest Therapy walks and hikes, transformational coaching, meditation primers, and retreats.

See our interview in Hudson Valley Magazine.
Through John’s guidance, I reconnected with a part of me and with nature that I had long forgotten as a person who lives amongst buildings, cars and trains. I found my childish wonder return, and my desire to feel more present and connected in the trees as well as after I returned home. It seems to me that John is a skillful facilitator that helped me connect more with my natural environments as well as connect more with myself.
James Young, Bronx Professor